Grooming Advice

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Ruthycpr
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Grooming Advice

Post by Ruthycpr » Mon Feb 04, 2019 7:40 pm

Hello All :)

I wondered if anyone had any experience of this and could offer any advice.

I have a 4yo Siberian, I groom him often and he loves the top half of his body (face, neck, chest, back) being groomed, literally moving in to new positions i can groom new bits, putting his arms up so I can do his armpits etc.

However, as time has gone on and he's got older, he's gone increasingly aggressive towards me grooming his back legs, the side of his body towards his tail and towards his bum. It is starting to worry me a bit as it's got to the point I've backed off grooming this area as much as I don't want to stress him out, I can't feel any knots, the bits of skin I can see when I separate his hair seems ok, though he does seem prone to dandruff in this area. He grooms himself well. I can't feel any lumps or bumps that would suggest injury. When I do get the chance to groom this area I'm gentle and make sure i'm holding the hair in a way that means it won't be pulling on his skin but he still protests strongly so again I back off.

I was wondering if it was a case of the hair being pulled in a new direction (for those who have had pony tails, as you know, it can be very painful when you would let your hair down at the end of the day so something like that) or if it's a case of he just doesn't like this area being groomed, or if it sounds like something it wrong.

Has anyone else experience this with their long haired cat? Should I be worried by his reaction and take him to the vet? Should i persevere and try grooming this area, or should I just leave him to it? Any ideas or advice welcome :)

booktigger
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Re: Grooming Advice

Post by booktigger » Mon Feb 04, 2019 8:17 pm

I would get him checked by a vet, if he was older it could be indicative of arthritis

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Ruth B
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Re: Grooming Advice

Post by Ruth B » Mon Feb 04, 2019 9:10 pm

I'd certainly suggest getting him checked by a vet to make sure there isn't an obvious problem, other than that a softer brush might help, although it might not be good enough to get through the coat thoroughly, or if he will let you stroke him in those areas then some type of grooming mit might help.

The problem I can see coming is if he won't let you groom him there then small mats will start which he won't be able to get out himself, mats do pull on the skin and will make him sore, making it even harder to solve the problem.

hopefully it's nothing serious and you can get him groomed fully in future.

Ruthycpr
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Re: Grooming Advice

Post by Ruthycpr » Mon Feb 04, 2019 9:18 pm

Thank you both :)

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Lilith
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Re: Grooming Advice

Post by Lilith » Mon Feb 04, 2019 9:39 pm

Hi and welcome :) I have a slightly similar problem so this is my two cents' worth -

My Mouse (silly name I know) is shorthaired, but has an intensely thick and plushy coat. She's 17 now and prone to matted britches. Her father (they were ferals before they joined me) was just the same as he got older and I could NOT keep him unmatted in old age; at the vet's a nurse said that her old lad matted up too and frankly she didn't bother to keep him spotlessly groomed ...

Both Mouse and her father suffered from arthritis; of late Mousey's been ok though I'll put her back on green-lipped mussel powder (a very good daily remedy; contains chondroitin) if I see any problems, but for now I'm grooming her with one of those pin-headed brushes and a steel comb (used carefully, just gliding it along.) She's moulting a lot (due to the central heating I think) and like your boy she's very dandruffy, and although she doesn't mind her back end being brushed, if I catch a deep-rooted mat or she's had enough, she'll bite. This is a very sweet timid cat who's never offered any aggression, so I know I'd better take notice lol. Then she'll give me a love, and we manage to end the grooming with a fuss and a cuddle.

As Booktigger says, it could be a good idea to get your lad checked out for arthritis, but if he's not matted round his backside then that's a good thing and I wouldn't bother him unduly but it's always a worry with a longhaired cat I know; you have to keep checking.

Hope you go on ok with him.

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MarySkater
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Re: Grooming Advice

Post by MarySkater » Tue Feb 05, 2019 12:31 pm

I have a Norwegian Forest Cat, who I think would count as semi-longhaired. (Lots of long hair, but not as thick as a Persian's.) She doesn't get angry if I try to groom her, but she's just very wriggly and won't keep still long enough for me to do much to her.
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She's 2 1/2 years old now, and in general keeps herself well-groomed, but when she was younger she would sometimes develop a mat in one of the awkward places. I bought a battery-powered clipper, and took my time about getting her used to it, first the noise, and then the touch. It works beautifully. If I located a mat in her fur, I'd put down food for her so she was distracted, and then the clipper just lifted the mat out with no strain. I checked her coat regularly with my hands, so I'd find any lump developing before it got tight to her skin.

So if matting is a problem, I'd definitely recommend clipping it out rather than trying to groom it out.

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Re: Grooming Advice

Post by Mollycat » Fri Mar 01, 2019 12:47 pm

I don't want to cause alarm but dandruff on the back end can be a sign of physical or psychological distress. As a precaution I would have a vet take a little look. My long-hair doesn't like those area but never has and has got better about it over time, but I would definitely be suspicious if he got more grouchy or any dandruff appeared.
Could you try a different kind of brush? Mine hates a brush but I can do almost anything with a comb and a pint of patience.

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