Help! Part 2

Queries and discussions about cat rescue & rehoming
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Propoet86
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Help! Part 2

Post by Propoet86 » Thu Oct 24, 2019 10:17 am

Well, I found our new addition! Not sure how she got where she ended up (underneath the drawer of a built-in wall cabinet in my bedroom) or if she's been getting in and out this whole time. My original kitten (around 11 months, new cat is 3 years) has been in and out of that room often, she sleeps with us...there has been still no signs of aggression or aggravation from the kitten and we haven't heard the new cat meowing or hissing as we're getting in and out of that closet/drawer.

However, tonight my husband was sure he saw her in the living room as he was getting home and she ran in there and got in the spot she's in. He tried to comfort her and see if she'd come out...she started hissing, growling, and took a swipe at him. When I returned home from work I went in there and tried talking to her and seeing if I could coax her out (about 3 hours after he tried).

What should I do? It's not fair to my current kitty to kick her out of the bedroom but I don't want them to fight and one of them end up getting hurt...

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Mollycat
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Re: Help! Part 2

Post by Mollycat » Thu Oct 24, 2019 10:58 am

If there's no problem between the cats I would leave her be. A cat should never be blocked from accessing its safe place, especially one in a strange place with strange people and another cat she hasn't had time to bond with. Let her come out when she feels confident to do so and in the meantime talk to her gently whenever you're in the room, make sure she has access to all her basic needs, and let her sort herself out. If you can spend some time in the room sitting very still taking no notice of her but maybe talking softly to her she can get used to your voice being friendly and your presence being no threat. now you know where she is I would talk to her every time you open that drawer or do anything near to her hiding place and eventually she will get the idea - you know she's there, you mean her no harm, she is safe and will be left alone when she wants.

If there is no issue between the two cats, the kitten isn't trying to get to her or showing any aggression, then it could end up being a friendly kitten that can bring her out and show her that this house is friendly to her. That's what happened when I adopted my girl, she stayed under the bed for a week coming out only at night or when nobody was home, while my boy encouraged her and helped her gain confidence. Any time there was any issue between the two of them if I left the house it would be fine by the time I got home. I never separated them. All depends on your kitten's character of course, you are the best judge of that, but this is just to say with the best intentions on our part to control the introduction process, occasionally the cats do it better themselves and we actually get in the way.

Cats are very self-reliant and a stranger attempting to coax or comfort them can just feel threatening to them especially when cornered in a hiding place. Seems by her reaction hissing growling and lashing out that's the way she sees things right now. Given time and space to settle then she will be able to trust and bond with you, and then she might accept comforting from you. As I always tell people about my girl - the most important thing she needs to know from you is that you will leave her alone, once she knows that, then she can make friends.

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Kay
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Re: Help! Part 2

Post by Kay » Thu Oct 24, 2019 10:48 pm

excellent advice there - I would just add that getting down and fronting her when she has nowhere to go is a big no no at the moment, but danging a toy such as da Bird along the floor where she can see it might be difficult to resist

and you will find the pleasure you get out of gradually bringing her out of her shell will far exceed that of having a friendly easy cat from the get go

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